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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

Part 1: General Information        …………………………………….…………………………………..….         p. 

 

A.      Overview

B.      Instructions

C.      Timeline and Key Dates

 

 

Part 2: School Improvement Plan Template   ………………………………………………………         p. 

 

Section 1: Cover Page

Section 2: Vision, Mission, and Values

Section 3: Data Profile and Needs Analysis

Section 4: School Priority Areas and SMART Goals

Section 5: School Improvement Strategies and Implementation Timeline

Section 6: District-wide Initiatives

 

 

Part 3: Requirement Checklists     …..…………..………………………………………………………           p.

 

A.      Title I School-Wide Program Checklist

B.      SIG Model Elements Checklist (SIG Only)

 


 

PART 1: GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Overview

 

Pawtucket Public Schools participate in the Title I School wide Program, which give schools greater latitude in organizing their resources and operations to support school improvement and improved student outcomes.  As such, all schools are required to prepare school improvement plans.  While PSD requires schools to prepare school improvement plans every two years, federal regulation requires schools to submit school improvement plans every year.  The district simplifies this process by asking schools to prepare two-year plans instead of yearly plans, but schools must revisit and modify the plan at the end of the first year and prior to the start of the second year.  In other words, schools will be asked to revise their plans between years 1 and 2.

 

The planning process is the first phase in a very important cycle of implementation effectiveness and performance monitoring.  Pawtucket School Department has modified and streamlined the planning process to ensure that it is coherent, comprehensive, actionable, and results-oriented.  The new school improvement plan (SIP) template is designed to provide a step-by-step, strategic approach to promote ongoing improvement district-wide.  Through the planning process, school teams will:

 

1.       Articulate the mission, vision and values of the school;

2.       Provide a data profile and needs analysis;

3.       Identify three to four SMART goals to address the prioritized areas of need;

4.       List specific strategies and implementation milestones to achieve each goal.

 

Instructions

 

Review and follow all directions carefully when completing the SIP template.   School administrators should collaborate with their Instructional Leadership Teams (ILT) to complete all sections of the SIP template and use the checklist located in the Appendix Section to review the completed plan.

 

Timeline and Key Dates

 

1. School teams attend SIP planning sessions

 

2. School Teams/ Data teams do needs assessment

Ongoing

3. School teams submit SIP sections 1-4 to Central Office for review

May 28th

4. Feedback is given to school teams if needed.

June 3rd

4. School teams incorporate feedback and complete sections 5

June 3rd - June 14th

5. Schools submit a final draft SIP for approval

June 14th

 

 

PART 2: SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN TEMPLATE

 

Section 1: Cover Page

 

Instructions: Please complete this cover page by entering the requested information below.

 

Name of School:

Agnes Little School

School Address:

60 South Bend St., Pawtucket, RI 02860

School Principal Name:

Mr. Raymond Dalton

Classification (check one):

q SIG School

q ESEA Waiver Warning School

q ESEA Waiver Focus School

q ESEA Waiver Priority School

q None of the above

 

 

 

ILT/SIT Member Names:

 

 

 

1. Raymond Dalton , Principal and Co-Chair person

2. Ron Beaupre, Math Interventionist

3. Kari-Ann Cute, Gr. 2 Teacher and Co-Chairperson

4. Kim Heon, Gr. 3 Teacher

5. Janet Rabbitt, Gr. 3 Teacher

6. Linda Warzycha, Gr. 1 Teacher

7. Michele Zabinski, Gr. 4 Teacher

8. Stephanie Baxter, Gr. 4 Teacher

9. Lisa Wagoner, Gr. 5 Teacher

10. Cathy Chatowsky, ESL Resource Teacher

11. Beth DuBois, Intermediate Self Contained Teacher

12. Deonna Pace, Kindergarten Teacher

13. Camille Nixon, Library/Media Specialist

Parent and Community Member , Co Representatives:

Krystal Kohloff, Jaclyn Quaine, and Marion Forrest, all parents

 

Superintendent :

 

Superintendent ‘s Signature:

 

Date:

 

School Principal Signature:

 

Date:

 

 


 

Section 2: Vision, Mission, and Values

 

Instructions: Using the space provided below, insert the school’s vision statement describing the school’s aspirations for the future.  Insert the mission statement explaining the school’s driving purpose.  Lastly, define the core values or guiding beliefs that are to be embodied by all staff, students, and members of the school community. 

 

What is the school’s vision statement?

Agnes E. Little Elementary School is a multicultural, educational community built on the foundation that all students can and will reach their highest potential as learners and citizens. Our primary function is to develop life-long, learners with 21st Century skills who intrinsically value education and are willing to work collaboratively to reach high standards as students and citizens. Rooted in the fundamental belief that each child matters equally, staff are professionally committed to creating an environment where all students are both challenged and supported in their development. High standards are fostered in a supportive, nurturing fashion as students and staff work in unity to learn and achieve academically and socially while paving the way to best possible experiences and outcomes.

 

What is the school’s mission statement?

 

The mission of Agnes Little School is to enable all learners to become high achievers who are productive members of an ever changing competitive global society through:

  • Reading, writing, speaking, and listening effectively for a variety of purposes
  • Participating in a responsible, respectful and cooperative learning community that enthusiastically pursues excellent
  • Being critical thinkers and problem solvers
  • Recognizing diversity as a strength
  • Accessing and applying technology to enhance the learning process
  • Developing skills necessary to be a functioning member of society

 

What are the school’s core values?

  • Every child can learn
  • Everyone in the community, students, parents and teachers deserve respect and should be treated with respect
  • Staff need to meet and work together to help all students learn
  • School improvement is a continuous process
  • SEE HOME SCHOOL COMPACT

 

AGNES LITTLE HOME SCHOOL COMPACT

As a school community, we will strive to:

· Believe each child can learn

· Provide a curriculum and classroom environment that challenges all students to reach their highest potential

· Provide purposeful homework that supports the curriculum

· Explain homework guidelines and class expectations for behavior and achievement

· Provide a system that supports student organization and responsibility for homework assignments and school notices

· Communicate on a regular basis with families

· Respect and value the uniqueness of each student and their family

· Support school wide activities and encourage families to actively participate

 

As a student I will strive to:

· Believe I can learn and always try my best

· Attend school daily, ready to learn and on time

· Leave school daily with all homework and necessary materials

· Follow our school wide expectations and accept responsibility for my actions and my schoolwork

· Discuss with my family what I am learning in school and provide them with all school notices

· Actively participate during class

· Seek assistance from my teachers, family or peers when help is needed

· Encourage my family to take part in school wide activities

 

As a parent, I will strive to:

· Believe my child can learn

· Send my child to school every day, on time, appropriately dressed and ready to learn

· Provide the school with a way to be reached by phone and mail and notify the school of any changes

· Provide a quiet place, time, encouragement and support to complete homework

· Check each child’s folder or agenda and backpack nightly and help the child to stay organized, bring materials, notices and homework back and forth to school

· Support my child in following the school wide expectations and follow up at home with positive feedback or discipline when needed

· Communicate positively with my child about school, teachers, staff and principal

· Read with my child for 15-20 minutes each night

· Attend annual parent-teacher conference

· Attend school wide activities and programs offered to help families support the education of their children

· Be an active partner in my child’s learning and the Agnes Little School community

 

 

 

 

 

Section 3: Data Profile and Needs Assessment

3.1. SCHOOL DATA PROFILE

 

Instructions: Complete the school data profile below by providing enrollment and demographic data for the current school year and inserting achievement and school climate data for the past several years.

 

Grades:

K-5

# of Administrators:

1

Student Enrollment:

440

# of Teachers:

30

5-yr Enrollment Trend:

491-440

# of Support Staff:

5

Student Demographic Breakdown (2012-13):

% Black:

19.5

% Limited English Proficient (LEP)

8.9

% Hispanic:

33.5

% Special Education:

13.5

% White:

40.5

% Free/Reduced (F/R) Meals:

85.6

% Other:

 

 

NECAP Achievement (Teaching Year):

2010

2011

2012

2013

Math Overall % Proficient:

 

44

49

48

Math % Below Proficient:

 

56

51

52

Math African American % Proficient:

 

47

49

53

Math Hispanic % Proficient:

 

43

45

51

Math LEP % Proficient:

 

39

39

29

Math IEP % Proficient:

 

 

 

9

Reading Overall % Proficient:

 

56

61

63

Reading % Below Proficient:

 

44

39

37

Reading African American % Proficient:

 

60

62

66

Reading Hispanic % Proficient:

 

49

60

63

Reading LEP % Proficient:

 

36

65

46

Reading IEP % Proficient:

 

 

 

19

Writing Overall % Proficient:

35

41

57

55

Science Overall % Proficient:

25

22

16

23

School Climate Data:

2010

2011

2012

2013

Student Attendance Rate:

 

 

94

94

% of Students Chronically Absent:

 

 

9

 

Graduation Rate (HS only):

 

 

 

 

Dropout Rate (HS only):

 

 

 

 

3.2. NEEDS ANALYSIS

 

Instructions:  Prior to identify goals and strategies, school teams must engage in a thorough needs assessment to evaluate the current state of the school.  School administrators and teams should carefully analyze school qualitative and quantitative data to identify school strengths and areas for development.  Consider strengths and weaknesses in the following areas: academic achievement, teacher and leader effectiveness, curriculum and instruction, family and community engagement, use of time, use of data, culture and climate, and nonacademic supports.  Summarize the school’s greatest strengths and growth areas and provide specific data points to support the analysis.

 

Summarize the school’s greatest strengths.

*High expectations for all students

*Increase of 7% in Reading on NECAP State Testing from 2011-2013

*Firmly established PLC teams who consistently meet to discuss curriculum, instruction and assessment to develop plans to increase achievement for all students

*Support staff, ESL Resource, Reading, Math and Special Education , who work in association with classroom teachers to determine how best to support students they service

*Staff wide consistent communication with parents through newsletters, school and individual teacher (classroom and support staff) websites, emails, texts, and face to face meetings

* Consistent progress monitoring for students not performing at grade level

* Use of computer programs at school and home (IXL, DreamBox) to involve parents in child’s education

* Home School Compact with signed commitment by teachers, parents and students for each child

*Social, emotional and health instruction and support

*School wide behavior plan with clear expectations and rewards for good behavior

*Staff who take active role in school and district plans and innovation

*Celebrations to encourage and reward academic improvement

*Involvement with many community organizations to provide additional support and resources for students and their families

*School sponsored educational activities to support parents in better understanding school curriculum and expectations.

*Active Friends of Agnes Little/PTO who support social and academic concerns for students and families

* Mentor Program which matches up a student with a non grade level teacher to assist students with academic, social and behavioral issues.

* Median Growth Score gains (school target) of 45 or more in all grade levels (47-54) and in 12 of 15 classrooms on STAR Math (range from 32-75)

* Median Growth Score gains (school target) of 45 or more in 2 of 3 grade levels (43-50) and in 7 of 12 individual classrooms (40-57) on STAR Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summarize the school’s most significant growth areas.

*Math growth as indicated by state NECAP testing has been flat in regards to percentage of students scoring at the Proficient or Above at a level lower than 50%, however, we have been decreasing percentage of students at the Significantly Below Level

*Although we have been improving our proficiency percentage in Reading over the past few years to 63% in most current testing, we need to continue improvement to work toward a greater percentage of our students at the Proficient or Above Level through analysis of DIBELS and STAR Assessments given throughout the year.

* Need to improve student performance in district writing assessments in all grades

*Increase the use of formative assessments

*Increase parent involvement in the school/education of their children

*Increase use of technology skills to improve abilities to show academic growth in all school areas.

 

Section 4: School Priority Areas and SMART Goals

Instructions:  Successful and sustainable school improvement requires a targeted and focused approach on the school’s most pressing needs and challenges.  Please reflect upon school data and the needs analysis in Section 3 to identify a manageable set of priorities to guide the school’s improvement efforts over the next two years. Based on these identified priorities develop 3 or 4 SMART goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, results-oriented, and time-bound.  SMART goals should align to and support the district’s vision, mission, and goals. 

 

Step 1: Priority Areas

 

Priority Areas: Based upon the analysis conducted, what 3 to 4 priorities emerge for the school? Cite relevant evidence from your analysis to support these priorities.

*Increase the ability of students to show growth in the writing skills as measured by the district writing assessments.

 

First Trimester District Writing Assessment Results:

Gr. K: 4 = 0, 3 = 0, 2 = 43, 1 = 27

Gr. 1: 4 = 1, 3 = 17, 2 = 23, 1 = 28

Gr. 2: 4 = 1, 3 = 16, 2 = 31, 1 = 12

Gr. 3: 4 = 1, 3 = 20, 2 = 50, 1 = 7

Gr. 4: 4 = 2, 3 = 18, 2 = 40, 1 = 12

Gr. 5: 4 = 0, 3 = 6, 2 = 34, 1 = 14

 

*Improve student performance on district math assessments from Sept., 2014 to June, 2015

 

Gr. K = Kindergarten Math Pre Assessment Results= 51 students scored 0, 6 students scored 1 question correct, 3 students scored 2 questions correct, 2 students scored 4 questions correct, 1 student scored 5 questions correct.

Gr. 1 = Fluency in Addition and Subtraction: 3 scored under 25%, 57 students scored less than 50%, 1 scored 50%, 2 scored over 50%

Gr. 2-5 STAR Testing:

Gr. 2 = 35 Benchmark, 8 Watch, 9 Intervention, 9 Urgent Intervention

Gr. 3 = 50 Benchmark, 15 Watch, 7 Intervention, 8 Urgent Intervention

Gr. 4 = 45 Benchmark, 4 Watch, 11 Intervention, 14 Urgent Intervention

Gr. 5 = 44 Benchmark, 8 Watch, 8 Intervention, 3 urgent Intervention

 

*Improve student performance on district reading assessments from Sept., 2014 to June, 2015

Gr K LNF = 48 Intensive, 5 Strategic, 13 Core

Gr. 1 NWF-WWR = 43 Intensive, 12 Stratgic, 13 Core

Gr. 2 DORF WCPM = 37 Intensive, 16 Stratigic, 14 Core

Gr. 3-6 STAR Results:

Gr. 3 = 30 Benchmark, 15 Watch, 14 Intervention, 22 Urgent Intervention

Gr. 4 = 33 Benchmark, 8 Watch, 14 Intervention, 22 Urgent Intervention

Gr. 5 = 27 Benchmark, 14 Watch, 14 Intervention, 7 Urgent intervention

 

 

Step 2: SMART Goals

 

Goal #1: Insert the first SMART goal below.

District strategic alignment:

Students will show growth in writing over the 2014-2015 school year as measured by the use of the district rubrics. All three rubrics measure organization and language conventions. 100% of students who scored a 1, 2, or 3 will move 2 points and 100% of students scoring a 4 will remain a 4 as measured from a baseline assessment used at the beginning of the year compared with a post/summative assessment given with the same rubrics at the end of the year.

First Trimester District Writing Assessment Results:

Gr. K: 4 = 0, 3 = 0, 2 = 43, 1 = 27

Gr. 1: 4 = 1, 3 = 17, 2 = 23, 1 = 28

Gr. 2: 4 = 1, 3 = 16, 2 = 31, 1 = 12

Gr. 3: 4 = 1, 3 = 20, 2 = 50, 1 = 7

Gr. 4: 4 = 2, 3 = 18, 2 = 40, 1 = 12

Gr. 5: 4 = 0, 3 = 6, 2 = 34, 1 = 14

 

q Engaged students and families

q Highly-effective educators

X Student-centered instruction

q Systems that work

X Collaborative community

 

Goal #2: Insert the second SMART goal below.

District strategic alignment:

Students will show growth in mathematics in grades K and 1 based on progress on the District Pre/Post Assessment and in grades 2-5 based on growth on the STAR assessment.

  • In grades K and 1, 80% of students will improve 12 questions correct District Pre/Post Assessment.
  • In grades 2-5 100% of at/above benchmark students will remain at/above benchmark, 75% of students in on watch, intervention, and urgent intervention will improve their scaled score 40 points and/or move to the next support level.

q Engaged students and families

q Highly-effective educators

X Student-centered instruction

q Systems that work

X Collaborative community

 

Goal #3: Insert the third SMART goal below.

District strategic alignment:

Students will show growth in reading in gradesK,1, and 2 based on progress on the DIBELS Benchmark Assessment and in grades 3-5 based on growth on the STAR assessment.

  • In grade K100% of core students will remain core, 75% of strategic will move to core, 25% of strategic will increase their composite score by 90 points, 50 % of intensive will move to strategic, 50 % of intensive will increase their composite score by 70 points.
  • In grade 1 on the NWF test for WWR, 100% of core students will remain core, 100% of strategic students will move to core, 50% of intensive will move to strategic, and 50% of intensive will grow 6 WWR per minute.
  • In grade 2 100 % of students in core support will remain core, 75% in strategic and intensive support will increase their performance by at least 40 WCPM and/or move to the next support level.
  • In grades 3, 4, and 5 100% of at/above benchmark students will remain at/above benchmark, 75% of students in on watch, intervention, and urgent intervention will improve their scaled score 40 points and/or move to the next support level.

q Engaged students and families

q Highly-effective educators

X Student-centered instruction

q Systems that work

X Collaborative community


Section 5: School Improvement Strategies and Implementation Timeline

 

Instructions: Identify a comprehensive and coherent set of strategies that are aligned with the school’s SMART goals identified in Section 4.  Select strategies that are transformative, actionable, and student-centered.  Complete the strategic planning process outlined below for each of the SMART goals.  Provide a performance metric to help measure progress and gauge whether or not the strategy is being implemented effectively and with fidelity.  Identify when each strategy will occur by year and semester.

 

Goal #1: Insert your first SMART goal below.

Students will show growth in writing over the 2014-2015 school year as measured by the use of the district rubrics. All three rubrics measure organization and language conventions. 100% of students who scored a 1, 2, or 3 will move 2 points and 100% of students scoring a 4 will remain a 4 as measured from a baseline assessment used at the beginning of the year compared with a post/summative assessment given with the same rubrics at the end of the year.

First Trimester District Writing Assessment Results:

Gr. K: 4 = 0, 3 = 0, 2 = 43, 1 = 27

Gr. 1: 4 = 1, 3 = 17, 2 = 23, 1 = 28

Gr. 2: 4 = 1, 3 = 16, 2 = 31, 1 = 12

Gr. 3: 4 = 1, 3 = 20, 2 = 50, 1 = 7

Gr. 4: 4 = 2, 3 = 18, 2 = 40, 1 = 12

Gr. 5: 4 = 0, 3 = 6, 2 = 34, 1 = 14

 

 

Summary: Briefly describe the school’s comprehensive approach to produce gains in this goal area.

Educators will collaborate at PLC sessions to review data, plan instruction, and create and research formative assessments. Sometimes collaboration will occur with the support of special educators and ELL teachers. Staff will work together to compile resources, lessons, and formative assessments to create a binder. Professional development will be provided by the district to support teachers in the transition to the common core. A display case of writing exemplars and rubrics will be created by each grade level.

Strategies: Identify a core set of strategies to achieve this goal.

Funding: If the strategy requires funding identify source: local or Title I

ESEA Waiver Intervention:

(If applicable)

Performance Metric: Identify an indicator for each strategy.

2014-15

2015-16

T1

T2

T3

 

T1

T2

T3

 

1.1. Develop and manage Common Core Standards resources that serve as guiding documents and contain exemplars for staff reference and use.

N/A

 

Binder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.2. Work together to compile formative assessments to enhance data collection and analysis

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheets

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.3. Compile K-2 and 3-6 resource binders that are available to staff that may include sample lessons, rubrics, identified websites, unitideasand other pertinent materials.

N/A

 

Binder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4. Allot time for additional professional development to deepen faculty understanding of Common Core Progressions and curricular expectations.

Title 1

 

Minutes and sign in sheets of professional development sessions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.5. UseProfessional Learning Community sessionregularlyfor a writing emphasis: planning, unit development, scoring/calibration, District Writing Tasks and general collaboration for purposes of written language instruction and/or support and training.

N/A

 

PLC summary sheets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.6. School-wide graphic organizer utilized for a variety of writing tasks across grade levels over time.

N/A

 

Binder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.7. Create and manage a writing display forum for the school community that aligns with curricular timeframes.

N/A

 

Monthly writing displays with photo record

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.8. Family-Oriented Academic Event(s) to promote literacy.

PTO

 

Sign in Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015 REVIEW OF PROGRESS OF WRITING PLAN

 

1.1 

Common Core standards resources have been collected in binder

 

1.2 

Binder has been begun but nee more examples in both K-2 and 3-5

 

1.3 

Rubrics have been collected mostly from Gr. 3-5 but need more K-2 materials.  Do need more Formative Assessments

 

1.4

Not accomplished.  Need to work with district to provide training.

 

1.5 

PLC notes will document many PLC meetings on writing especially during district writing tasks.  Did not happen at least once a month but more intensive during parts of the year and will probably avg. out to the required total of meetings.

 

1.6

Different versions of a common school wide graphic organizer were distributed to all staff.  Still need to collect more task/topic specific examples from staff.

 

1.7

Photos taken of each grade level or specialist bulletin board presentations.  Photos are in resource binder.  All grades participated.

 

1.8

Grocery Store Academic Night had writing piece.  Some of the GAMM presentations had writing piece or at least students worked orally with staff to create script for plays based on literature students had read.

 

End of year district writing scores:

Third Trimester District Writing Assessment Results:

Gr. K: 4 = 0, 3 =38, 2 = 20, 1 = 9

Gr. 1: 4 = 8, 3 = 34, 2 = 15, 1 = 9

Gr. 2: 4 = 7, 3 = 24, 2 = 24, 1 = 8

Gr. 3: 4 = 5, 3 = 22, 2 = 34, 1 = 13

Gr. 4: 4 = 4, 3 = 23, 2 = 31, 1 = 9

Gr. 5: 4 = 1, 3 = 3, 2 = 39, 1 = 22

 

 

Goal #2: Insert your first SMART goal below.

Students will show growth in mathematics in grades K and 1 based on progress on the District Pre/Post Assessment and in grades 2-5 based on growth on the STAR assessment.

In grades K and 1, 80% of Students will show growth in mathematics in grades K and 1 based on progress on the District Pre/Post Assessment and in grades 2-5 based on growth on the STAR assessment.

  • In grades K and 1, 80% of students will improve 12 questions correct District Pre/Post Assessment.
  • In grades 2-5 100% of at/above benchmark students will remain at/above benchmark, 75% of students in on watch, intervention, and urgent intervention will improve their scaled score 40 points and/or move to the next support level. Students will improve 12 questions correct District Pre/Post Assessment.
  • In grades 2-5 100% of at/above benchmark students will remain at/above benchmark, 75% of students in on watch, intervention, and urgent intervention will improve their scaled score 40 points and/or move to the next support level.

Summary: Briefly describe the school’s comprehensive approach to produce gains in this goal area.

Educators will collaborate at PLC sessions to review data, plan instruction, form instructional groups (sometimes across grade levels based on student needs), and create and research formative assessments. Sometimes collaboration will occur with the support of the math interventionist, special educators, and ELL teachers. Staff will work together to compile resources, lessons, and formative assessments to create a binder. Professional development opportunities will be offered by the district to help teachers implement the STAR program.

Strategies: Identify a core set of strategies to achieve this goal.

Funding: If the strategy requires funding identify source: local or Title I

ESEA Waiver Intervention:

(If applicable)

Performance Metric: Identify an indicator for each strategy.

2014-15

2015-16

T1

T2

T3

 

T1

T2

T3

 

2.1. Provide Training on how to use the STAR Math and other formative assessment tools to identify the specific needs of our students.

Title 1

 

PLC summary sheets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.2. Staff collaboration to compile formativeassessment tools toenhance data collection and analysis .

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheets

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.3. Support staff will attend PLC sessions to offer suggestions, materials, and resources for intervention, to provide assistance in grouping students according to data, and aid in planning instruction. Itinerant, grade level, and specialist schedules will be aligned to provide common planning for PLC multiple times annually.

N/A

 

PLC summary sheets

Itinerant Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.4. Schedule opportunities for cross- grade level planning time during the school year.

N/A

 

PLC summary sheets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.5. Create a portfolio/binder of ideas to use (by grade level) during intervention time to teach/reinforce skills (to be housed in a common location).

N/A

 

Binder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.6. Academic Math Event(s) for families to promote mathematical practice/skills.

PTO

 

Sign in Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.1

Grade 2 teachers provided training in STAR by district.  PLC grade level teams and support staff used STAR data and grade level math assessments to analyze student achievement for instruction and grouping

 

2.2

Classroom prepared math assessments prepared and discussed at PLCs but more work needed in this area

 

2.3

PLC  meeting notes document many meetings between classroom teachers and support staff.  School schedule shows it was arranged all year

 

2.4

Cross grade groupings in a couple of grades (K and 1, 2 and 3) were scheduled for after school PLC’s in the fall but funding from district was pulled.  Will need to do this next year.

 

2.5

Portfolio of ideas to use for math instruction and intervention compiled by Math Support person housed in his office or various computer programs used including: Howard County, Engage New York, Georgia, Do the Math Kits, IXL math, Dreambox, Teacher Pay Teachers, File Folder games

 

Math support teacher to be trained by district soon on use of STAR tasks and when this is completed he will share with the staff what is available and how to access it.

 

2.6

Math/Health Night in March

Grocery Store Academic Night in April

K Curriculum Night in January

 

STAR Math Assessment Results:

Student Growth Percentages:

Gr. 2 = 47

Gr. 3 = 54

Gr. 4 = 54

Gr. 5 = 45

 

Goal #3: Insert your first SMART goal below.

Students will show growth in reading in grades K, 1, and 2 based on progress on the DIBELS Benchmark Assessment and in grades 3-5 based on growth on the STAR assessment.

  • In grade K 100% of core students will remain core, 75% of strategic will move to core, 25% of strategic will increase their composite score by 90 points, 50 % of intensive will move to strategic, 50 % of intensive will increase their composite score by 70 points.
  • In grade 1 on the NWF test for WWR, 100% of core students will remain core, 100% of strategic students will move to core, 50% of intensive will move to strategic, and 50% of intensive will grow 6 WWR per minute.
  • In grade 2 100 % of students in core support will remain core, 75% in strategic and intensive support will increase their performance by at least 40 WCPM and/or move to the next support level.
  • In grades 3, 4, and 5 100% of at/above benchmark students will remain at/above benchmark, 75% of students in on watch, intervention, and urgent intervention will improve their scaled score 40 points and/or move to the next support level.

Summary: Briefly describe the school’s comprehensive approach to produce gains in this goal area.

Educators will collaborate at PLC sessions to review data, plan instruction, form instructional groups (sometimes across grade levels based on student needs), and create and research formative assessments. Sometimes collaboration will occur with the support of reading specialists, special educators, and ELL teachers. Staff will work together to compile resources, lessons, and formative assessments to create a binder.

Strategies: Identify a core set of strategies to achieve this goal.

Funding: If the strategy requires funding identify source: local or Title I

ESEA Waiver Intervention:

(If applicable)

Performance Metric: Identify an indicator for each strategy.

2014-15

2015-16

T1

T2

T3

 

T1

T2

T3

 

3.1. Support staff will attend PLC sessions to offer suggestions, materials, and resources for intervention, to provide assistance in grouping students according to data, and aid in planning instruction as needed/requested.

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheet

Itinerant Schedule

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2. Staff will compile formative assessments togenerateand analyze data.

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheets

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.3. Grade level teachers willmeet multiple times annuallyin PLC to discuss reading data and share effective instructional practices.

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheets

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.4. Grade level teachers and support staff will make ongoing decisions for instruction and groupings based on data.

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheet

Grouping Sheet

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5. As appropriate, teachers will collaborate to plan for andgroup students based on needs during the intervention block.

N/A

 

PLC Summary Sheet

Grouping Sheet

Formative and Summative Assessment Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.6 Staff will explore and acquire resources to further literacy instruction.

N/A

 

Binder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.7. Academic Family Event(s) to promote literacy.

 

 

PTO

 

Sign in Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.8 School will work with the district to coordinate professional development.

N/A

 

Sign In Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.1

Fully implemented in Gr. 2 most of year.  Grade 1 implemented over last 1/3 of year.  Other grades not implementing this year.  Gr. 2 did presentation at spring faculty meeting of their way of doing this and discussed its successes.

 

3.2

District assessments used to discuss progress but need to create more grade level assessments for reading

 

3.3

Completed and documented in PLC meeting summary notes.

 

3.4

STAR and DIBELS data being used during PLC meetings (see PLC summaries) to create groupings of students

 

3.5

Done all year in Gr. 2 and part of the year in Gr. 1 for the entire class.  Done after benchmark testing times as a grade level in regards to determining which students received support services from support staff and for grouping within the classroom setting

 

3.6

Ongoing process.  Binders created, one for K-2 and one for Gr. 3-5 with ideas to share with other teachers.

 

3.7

* K Curriculum Night in January

* Grocery Store Academic Night in April

* Many classroom GAMM performances during the year (see writing plan)

* Theme Team presentation in Gr. 4

*Book Fairs held three times during the year—open for students during the day and for parents and students at night

*Need to develop surveys next year for all parent presentations, but sign in sheets were kept for whole school activities

 

STAR READING ASSESSMENT RESULTS:

Student Growth Percentages Increase:

Gr. 3 = 45

Gr. 4 = 50

Gr. 5 = 43

 

DIBELS data not available at this time


PART 3: REQUIREMENT CHECKLISTS

 

Title I School-wide Program Checklist

 

Instructions: Complete the Title I School-wide Program checklist to ensure that the school’s SIP meets the federal Title I requirements.  A comprehensive school improvement plan must address all of the components defined in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Section 1114(b) of Title I).

 

 

Component 1:  School-wide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children to meet the State’s proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement

 

Component 2:  Use of effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research that strengthen the core academic program, increase the amount and quality of time (such as providing before and after school and summer programs and opportunities), and include strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations.

 

Component 3:  Instruction by highly qualified teachersAll classroom teachers, Special Educators, and Support Personnel are Highly Qualified.

 

Component 4:  High-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, and if appropriate, pupil service personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children to meet the State’s academic achievement standards.

 

* Teachers collaborate with their grade level teams each week during scheduled PLC periods.   Special educators, the ESL Resource teacher, Reading teacher, Math Intervention teacher, and Support Staff available to meet as needed to discuss how their support can be used to increase grade level student results.

* Teachers analyze data from formative and summative assessment data for all students to determine needs and plan for intervention grouping.

* Two teachers and principal involved in action research in regards to use of assessment data and share results with staff at faculty meetings

* Faculty meetings used to keep staff up to date on district, state and national educational issues

Component 5: Strategies to attract highly qualified teachers to high-need schools

*Our school district provides new teacher orientation prior to the beginning of each school year and on going mentors appropriate to their grade and assignment

* PC, URI, and RIC student teachers and practicum students complete student teaching and practicum assignments at Little

Component 6: Strategies to increase parental involvement

*Parent Education Nights will be held during the course of the year to support academic and health issues.  Examples include Math Night at Local Grocery Store, Informational Reading Night, Parent-Student Walks, Math and Exercise Night

*Parents are involved in School Improvement Team

* Friends of Agnes Little/PTO support school’s parent education efforts

*Home-School Compact discussed with and signed by all involved in each’s child education

* First Day Activity held to start school where parents attend class with their child and learn about the grade and classroom academic expectations and how they can be involved in their child’s education

Component 7: Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs to local elementary school programs

*Kindergarten Orientation sessions held twice, in the spring before entering school as well as in August before school begins.  In May, teachers provide educational activities and show parents how to do them with the students while providing them with the materials needed to do them.  In September, parents are provided information on what they and their child should know about the Kindergarten Program.  Students then are assessed in early math and literacy skills before starting the first full day of school.

* Parents are offered the possibility of their child participating in a 3 week summer education program to help with transition to Kindergarten as well as to lean some early K skills.

Component 8: Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments in order to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program

*Teachers involved in School Improvement Team, Discipline Team, Educational Testing (Special Ed) Team

* PLC’s make decisions for instruction after developing and analyzing formative and summative assessments

Component 9:  Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance to ensure student difficulties are identified on a timely basis

*Reading and Math Intervention Blocks every day provide specific instruction, often after analysis of data at PLC meetings, for students struggling with a skill or concept.

* Assessment information used in determining students selected for reading and math support services

* RtI services provided to identified students as needed

*Some teachers provide additional before or after school tutoring instruction for students who need additional support.

Component 10: Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs

*Agnes Little will work with a variety of federal, state and local services and programs to inform, educate and assist students and families with their academic, social and health needs.

* In June, 2015 planning meeting was held to begin work on initiative to make Agnes Little School a Community School during the 2015-2016 school year.  Meetings will be held in July and August to continue this process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Agnes Little School

60 South Bend St.

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 02860 

www.psdri.net

 

 

 

 

Parent Involvement

Policy and Informational Handbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revised June, 2014

 

 


The Agnes Little School recognizes that parent and family involvement is essential to educating our students and preparing them for life-long learning.  Schools, families, and the community must all be actively involved in developing strong programs and policies that support the academic success of every student in the Pawtucket Public Schools. 

 

To this end, the Agnes Little School will strive to involve parents and family members of children of all ages and grade levels by developing and implementing systemic and school-based strategies and programs based on the following National PTA standards, indicators and suggested activities for successful parent/family involvement programs:

 

 

Communication between home and school is regular, two-way, and meaningful

 

Use a variety of communication tools on a regular basis seeking to facilitate two-way interaction.

¨   Principal Newsletters beginning of each month

¨   Student planners

¨   School calendars (also at School Web site)

¨   Signage outside schools

¨   Informational newsletters

¨   Parent orientations, K parent orientation

¨Open houses

¨   Interpreters as needed

¨   Translations as needed

¨   Phone calls as needed

¨   Pawtucket School Department’s Web Page www.psdri.net

¨   Agnes Little website

¨   Individual Teacher Web Pages

¨   Student Progress Reports each mid trimester point

¨   Home-School Compacts in September

¨   School Messenger Phone Alert as needed

¨   PTO meetings

¨   SIT meetings

¨   Parent teacher conferences

¨   Math/Health Night

¨   IEP meetings

¨   FBA meetings

¨   504 meetings

¨   Evaluation meetings

¨   First Day Celebration

¨   Parent scheduled meetings at arrival, dismissal, or during planning time

¨   Mother’s Day Tea

¨   K curriculum night

¨   Teacher newsletters (weekly and/or monthly)

¨   PARCC information sheet

¨   NECAP information sheet

¨   Common Core Standards information night

¨   Progress monitoring data sent home

¨   Academic graphs sent home

¨   Superkids website

¨   Dreambox

¨   IXL

¨   Dojo

¨   Extramath

¨   Bookfair flyers

 

Establishing opportunities for parents and educators to share partnering information such as students’ strengths and learning preferences.

¨   Individual student progress reports 3 times a year

¨   Report cards 3 times a year

¨   Personal Literacy Plans (if needed) ongoing throughout year

¨   Parent/Teacher conferences in December

¨   Assist parents in acquiring techniques to support their students’ learning and develop tools to help establish those areas where support is needed.

 

Provide clear information regarding course expectations and offerings, student placement, school activities, student services, and optional programs.

¨   Teacher Beginning of School letters

¨   School Newsletter each month

¨   School/District/Teacher Web pages

¨   PTO meeting flyers

¨   SIT meetings

¨   Parent teacher conference letters

¨   Math/Health Night flyer

¨   IEP meeting invitations

¨   FBA meeting invitations

¨   504 meeting invitations

¨   Evaluation meeting invitations

¨   First Day Celebration postcard

¨   Parent scheduled meetings at arrival, dismissal, or during planning time notes

¨   Mother’s Day Tea invitation

¨   K curriculum night invitation

¨   Teacher newsletters (weekly and/or monthly)

¨   PARCC information sheet

¨   NECAP information sheet

¨   Common Core Standards information night flyer

¨   Progress monitoring data sent home

¨   Academic graphs sent home

¨   Superkids website

¨   Dreambox

¨   IXL

¨   Dojo

¨   Extramath

¨   Bookfair flyers

 

Provide report cards and regular progress reports to parents.  Provide support services and follow-up conferences as needed.

¨   Progress reports 3 times a year

¨   Report Cards 3 times a year

¨   On-line communication ongoing

¨   Progress monitoring notes sent home during the year

¨   IEP progress notes

¨   FBA meeting notes

¨   504 meeting notes

 

Disseminate information on school reforms, policies, discipline procedures, assessment tools, and school goals, and include parents in any related decision-making process.

¨   Student Policy/Informational Handbook

¨   Mission Statements

¨   School Improvement Plans

¨   District Strategic Plan

¨   Parent Letters monthly

¨   District, School, and Teacher Web sites

¨   Office referral forms

¨   Common Core Standards information night

 

Conduct conferences with parents, with follow-up as needed.

¨   Each school will demonstrate an effort to reach families that are underrepresented at school conferences due to lack of transportation or child care problems, lack of confidence or time, and/or have limited literacy or limited English language skills.

¨   Schedule meetings with families that are convenient and offered at flexible (AM and PM) times.

¨   Texting as needed

¨   Face-to-face communication before and after school

 

Encourage immediate contact between parents and teachers when concerns arise.

¨   Written Communication/email as needed

¨   Phone Calls as needed

¨   Conferences as needed

¨   Progress monitoring sent home

¨   Academic graphs

¨   Homework

¨   Student planners

 

Distribute student work for parental comment and review on a regular basis.

¨   Assignments with scoring criteria

¨   Projects with scoring criteria

¨   Weekly folders

¨   Behavior charts

¨   Progress monitoring letters

¨   AR STAR reports

¨   Fact Master certificates

¨   Super Reader prizes

¨   Physical education award

¨   Blue bucks

¨   Purchases from school store

 

Translate communications to assist non-English speaking parents.

¨   Interpreters and Parent Liaisons as needed

 

Communicate with parents regarding positive student behavior and achievement, not just regarding misbehavior or failure.

¨   Student Progress Reports at least 3 times a year

¨   Personal phone call as needed

¨   Written communication as needed

¨   Open Houses in September

¨   Student planners daily

¨   Behavior charts

¨   Progress monitoring letters

¨   AR STAR reports

¨   Fact Master certificates

¨   Super Reader prizes

¨   Physical education award

¨   Blue bucks

¨   Purchases from school store

¨   5th grade awards night

¨   K celebration

 

Provide opportunities for parents to communicate with principals and administrative staff.

¨   Parent Orientations/First Day Activity in Sept.

¨   Parent Teacher Organization monthly

¨   Phone calls as needed

¨   Written Communication as needed

¨   Kindergarten Orientation Sept.

¨   SIT meetings

¨   Parent teacher conferences

¨   Math/Health Night

¨   IEP meetings

¨   FBA meetings

¨   504 meetings

¨   Evaluation meetings

¨   First Day Celebration

¨   Parent scheduled meetings at arrival, dismissal, or during planning time

¨   K curriculum night

¨   Common Core Standards information night

 

Promote informal activities at which parents, staff, and community members can interact.

¨       An Afternoon at the Supermarket - January

¨       Grade Level Parent Academic Learning Activity (maybe math 2-5 and K-2 early reading skills) time and topic to be determined by grade level - October at time of mid trimester progress reports

¨       Health Math Night - Late October/early November

¨       PARCC Prep. Night and how to respond to text, childcare provided - February  

¨       Public Library event and pass out applications for library cards - June

¨       Field trips throughout the year

¨       Musical performances - December and June

¨       Book Fair – December, April, and June

¨       Fundraisers as determined by PTO

 

Provide staff development regarding effective communication techniques and the importance of regular two-way communication between the school and the family.

¨ Identify areas where professional development is necessary to help teachers, administrators, and staff to work effectively with families, especially those of culturally diverse backgrounds and special education needs.

¨ District provided professional development such as Promoting Parental Involvement

 

 

 

Parents play an integral role in assisting student learning

 

Seek and encourage parental participation in decision-making that affects students.

¨   Parent/Teacher conferences

¨   IEP Conferences

¨   School Improvement Team

¨   Personal Literacy Plans

¨   Teacher Support Teams

¨   504 Plans

¨   PTO meetings

¨   FBA meetings

¨   Evaluation team meetings

 

Inform parents of the expectations for students in each subject at each grade level.

¨   Teacher Expectation and Information Letters in September

¨   School and Teacher Web Sites and email communication ongoing

¨   An Afternoon at the Supermarket - January

¨   Grade Level Parent Academic Learning Activity (maybe math 2-5 and K-2 early reading skills) time and topic to be determined by grade level - October at time of mid trimester progress reports

¨   Health Math Night - Late October/early November

¨   PARCC Prep. Night and how to respond to text, childcare provided - February  

¨   Public Library event and pass out applications for library cards - June

¨   Musical performances - December and June

¨   Book Fair – December, April, and June

¨   Report card Common Core information sheet

¨   STAR progress reports

¨   Mid-trimester Progress reports

¨   AR reports

¨   IEP progress notes

¨   Progress monitoring notes

Provide information regarding how parents can foster learning at home, giving appropriate assistance, monitor homework, and give feedback to teachers.

¨   Newsletters each month

¨   Home/School Compact in Sept.

¨   Workshops/Instructional activities at least 3 times during the year

¨   Provide guidelines for how to help students with their homework ongoing

¨   Interactive homework activities ongoing

¨   Curriculum (content) related websites on school website and sent various times during the year

¨   Tutorial and skill practice websites in math and literacy ongoing

¨   Student planners

¨   Friday packets

 

Sponsor workshops or distribute information to assist parents in understanding how students can improve skills, get help when needed, meet class expectations, and perform well on assignments.

¨   Parent workshops

¨   Newsletters

¨   Written communications

¨   Tutorial and skill practice websites in math and literacy

¨   Interactive homework activities

¨   Common Core information night

¨   Parent requested meetings before and after school

 

Provide opportunities for parental involvement in setting student goals and in planning for post-secondary education careers.

¨   Parent/Teacher conferences in December

¨   Parent/Guidance counselor conferences ongoing

¨   Transitioning from elementary to middle school

¨   IEP meetings

¨   504 meetings

¨   FBA meetings

¨   Evaluation team meetings

 

Provide opportunities for staff members to learn and share successful approaches to engaging parents in their child’s education.

¨   Professional development workshops

 

 

Parents are welcome in the school, and their support and assistance are encouraged

 

Encourage office staff greetings, signage near the entrances, and any other interaction with parents create a climate in which the parents feel valued and welcome.

¨   Create and maintain a responsive and welcoming atmosphere for parents and families.

¨   Showcase with upcoming events

¨   Principal outside at arrival and dismissal

¨   Teachers greeting at morning supervision

¨   Teacher interaction at arrival/dismissal

 

Survey parents regarding their interests, talents, and availability, then coordinate the parent resources with those that exist within the school and among the faculty.

¨   Interest surveys (Survey Works)

¨   School Improvement Teams

¨   First Day Celebration survey

¨   First Day Celebration packet

¨   Parent surveys at the end of events

 

Encourage parents who are unable to volunteer in the school building the option to help in other ways, at home or place of employment.

¨   Involve parents, whenever appropriate, in a variety of instructional and support roles both within as well as outside of the school.

 

Organize an easy, accessible program for utilizing parent volunteers, providing ample training on volunteer procedures and school protocol.

¨       PTO meetings

¨       PTO sponsored events

¨       Special Education Advisory Committee meetings

 

Develop a system for contacting parents to assist as the year progresses.

¨   Parent Liaisons from the district

¨   Newsletters

¨   Parent-Teacher Organizations

¨   Interpreters

 

Provide opportunities for those with limited time and resources to participate by addressing child care, transportation, work schedule needs, and so forth.

¨   Provide child care services

¨   Allow flexibility for parents to bring children to meetings and events

¨   Flexible scheduling

 

Show appreciation for parents’ participation, and value their diverse contributions.

¨   Acknowledge parental participation

¨   Thank you notes and small gifts of appreciation

 

Educate and assist staff members in creating an inviting climate and effectively utilizing volunteer resources.

¨   Professional development and informational workshops

 

Establish volunteer activities that are meaningful and built on volunteer interests and abilities.

¨   Activities are well-planned and meaningful

 

 

Parenting skills are promoted and supported

 

Communicate the importance of positive relationships between parents and their children.

¨   Inform parents of current research findings investigating Parent Involvement and student success.

¨   Assist parents in acquiring techniques to support their student’s development socially and academically.

¨   Provide access to and coordinate community and support services for children and families.

 

Link parents to programs and resources within the community that provide support services to families.

¨   Parent Liaisons

¨   Pawtucket School Department’s Child Opportunity Zones

¨   Social Workers

 

Support policies that recognize the variety of cultural traditions and religious diversity.

¨   Work in breaking down barriers and negative perceptions that stand in the way of education being recognized as a vital part of each child’s development into full and productive citizens of the community.

 

Provide an accessible parent/family information and resource center to support parents and families with training, resources, and other services.

¨   Child Opportunity Zones programs and staff at Agnes Little

¨   Central Office, 286 Main St., Pawtucket, RI

 

 

Parents are full partners in the decisions that affect children and families

 

Provide a process for addressing issues and/or concerns, appealing decisions, and resolving problems.

¨    Student Policy and Informational Handbook

¨    Encourage the formation of parent groups to identify and respond to issues of interests to parents.

¨    Work closely with all parent groups (e.g. PTO) in supporting parent and family initiatives that support academic achievement.

 

Include parents on decision-making and advisory committees, and provide training for such areas as policy, curriculum, budget, school reform initiatives, safety, and personnel.

¨    School Improvement and Action Planning

¨    Provide parents with current information regarding school policies, practices, and both student and school performance data.

¨    Student Policy and Informational Handbook

¨     Development of Parent Involvement Policy and Informational Handbook

¨    Annual evaluation of Parent Involvement Policy and Informational Handbook

¨    School Report Night

 

Encourage parents to participate as partners when setting school goals, developing or evaluating programs and policies, or responding to performance data.

¨    School Improvement Teams

¨    District Parent Involvement Team

¨    Development of Parent Involvement Policy and Informational Handbook

¨    Annual evaluation of Parent Involvement Policy and Informational Handbook

 

Encourage active parent participation in the decisions that affect students such as student placement, course selection, and individual personalized education plans.

¨    Approval of Individualized Educational Plans

 

Treat parental concerns with respect and demonstrate genuine interest in developing solutions.

¨    Invite parents to help create a plan to deal with individual student problems/issues.

 

Promote parent participation on school district, state, and national committees and issues.

¨    School Improvement Teams

¨    District Parent Involvement Team

 

Provide training for staff and parents on collaborative partnering and shared decision making.

¨   Parent/Teacher workshops

 

Transitions from Pre-school to Little and Little to Junior High

 

Work with Special Education and Preschool Programs to create smooth transitions for students into elementary school.  Provide opportunities for parents of all students entering Kindergarten to understand the expectations and routines in Kindergarten

 

·              Preschool staff meet and communicate with Little Kindergarten staff to discuss student needs and plans

·              Provide a Kindergarten orientation program in the Spring for entering students to share activities that can be used with the children in the summer before entering Kindergarten in the fall

·              Provide K orientation in August before students enter school to review Kindergarten routines and expectations before first full day of school.

·              Assess students before school begins and share information with parents so they have a better understanding of their child’s readiness for the Kindergarten program.

 

Work with Junior High to prepare students and parents for transition to that level

·              Provide in school opportunity for students to visit the Junior High for a tour and explanation of schedules, etc.

·              Parent Night held by Junior High promoted by Little School to allow them the same opportunity provided to students.

 

 

What is No Child Left Behind?

 

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001(NCLB) is a landmark in education reform designed to improve student achievement and change the culture of America’s schools.  With the passage of No Child Left Behind, Congress reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA) – the principle federal law affecting education from kindergarten through high school.  In amending ESEA, the new law represents a sweeping overhaul of federal efforts to support elementary and secondary education in the United States.  Every state will test all students in grades three through eight and grade eleven on what they know in math and reading, and students in grades four, eight, and eleven will be tested in science, too.

 

What is a Title I School?

 

Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA) targets federal funds to high-poverty communities to provide compensatory educational services to low-achieving students.  These funds are distributed by a poverty-based formula to approximately 90 percent of the school districts in the nation. 

 

Parent involvement has always been an integral part of Title I.  Under the new Law, No Child Left Behind, one of the new purposes of Title I is to ensure that funds are used to promote parent involvement.  Parents should take full advantage of the opportunities for involvement that the law provides.

 

Every district receiving Title I money is required to:

¨     Develop with parents a written parent involvement policy that is then distributed to parents and made available to the local community.

¨     Convene an annual meeting of parents to inform them of the policy and their right to be involved.

¨     Reading teachers and Kindergarten teachers are funded through Title 1.

¨     Offer flexible parent involvement meetings, if necessary, with Title I money to provide child care, transportation, or home visits.

¨     Involve parents in an organized and ongoing way in the planning, review, and improvement of school programs.

¨     Develop with parents a Home-School Compact that outlines actions to be taken to improve individual student academic achievement.

¨     Increase opportunities for parent involvement in the school by helping parents understand academic content standards and state achievement standards and assessments.

¨     Provide materials and training for parents, teachers, pupil services personnel, and other staff to foster greater parent involvement.

¨     Integrate activities with other programs:  Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), English as a Second Language (ESL), etc.

 

Research Findings

 

(Henderson A. & Berta N:  The Evidence Grows (1981);

The Evidence Continues to Grow (1987); and A Generation of Evidence:  The Family is Critical to Student Achievement (1995).  An analysis of more than 85 studies.

 

Parent Involvement and Student Success

§ When parents are involved, students achieve more, regardless of socio-economic status, ethnic/racial background, or the parents’ educational level.

§ The more extensive the parent involvement, the higher the student achievement.

§ When parents are involved in their students’ education, those students have higher grades and test scores, better attendance, and complete homework more consistently.

§ When parents are involved, students exhibit more positive attitudes and behavior.

§ Students whose parents are involved in their lives have higher graduation rates and greater enrollment rates in post-secondary education.

§ Different types of parent /family involvement produce different gains.  To have long-lasting gains for students, parental involvement activities must be well-planned, inclusive, and comprehensive.

§ In programs that are designed to involve parents in full partnerships, student achievement for disadvantaged children, not only improves, but also can reach levels that are standard for middle-class children.  In addition, the children who are farthest behind make the greatest gains.

§ Children from diverse cultural backgrounds tend to do better when parents and professionals collaborate to bridge the gap between the culture at home and the learning institution.

§ Student behaviors, such as alcohol use, violence, and antisocial behavior decrease as parental involvement increases.

§ Students are more likely to fall behind in academic performance if their parents do not participate in school events, fail to develop a working relationship with their child’s educators, or keep up with what is happening in their child’s school.

§ The benefits of involving parents are not confined to the early years; there are significant gains at all ages and grade levels.

§ Junior and senior high school students, whose parents remain involved, make better transitions, maintain the quality of their work, and develop realistic plans for their future.  Students whose parents are not involved, on the other hand, are more likely to drop out of school.

§ The most accurate predictor of a student’s achievement in school is not income or social status, but the extent to which that student’s family is able to 1) create a home environment that  encourages learning; 2) communicate high, yet reasonable expectations for children’s achievement and future careers; and 3)become involved in their children’s education and in the community. 

 

Parent Involvement and School Quality

§ Schools that work well with families have improved teacher moral and higher ratings of teachers by parents

§ Schools where parents are involved have more support from families and better reputations from the community.

§ School programs that involve parents out perform identical programs without parent and family involvement.

§ Schools where children are failing improve dramatically when parents are enabled to become effective partners in their child’s education.

§ The school’s practice to inform and involve parents are strong determinants of whether inner-city parents will be involved with their children’s education, family size, marital status, and even student grade level.

 

Parent Involvement and Program Design

§ The more the relationship between parents and educators approaches a comprehensive, well-planned partnership, the higher the student achievement.

§ For low-income families, programs offering home visits are more successful in involving parents than programs requiring parents to visit the school.  However, when the parents become involved at school, their children make even greater gains.

§ When parents receive frequent and effective communication from the school or program, their involvement increases, their overall evaluation of educators improves, and their attitudes toward the program are more positive.

§ Parents are much more likely to become involved when educators encourage and assist parents in helping their children with their schoolwork.

§ Effective programs are lead by a team of administrators, educators, and parents, and have access to financial resources.

§ When they are treated as partners and given relevant information by people with whom they are comfortable, parents put into practice the involvement strategies they already know are effective, but have been hesitant to contribute.

§ One of the most significant challenges to conducting an effective program is the lack of instruction on parent and family involvement that educators and administrators receive in their professional training.

§ Collaboration with families is an essential component of a reform strategy, but it is not a substitute for high-quality education programs or comprehensive school improvement.

 

 

SEDL:  The National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools

http://www.sedl.org/connections/

 

The School-Family Connection: Looking at the Larger Picture - A Review of Current Literature (PDF file: 1.3MB) In SEDL's latest review of family involvement literature, The School-Family Connection: Looking at the Larger Picture, A Review of Current Literature surveys thirty research reports and meta-analyses published between 2005 and 2008. These studies explore a wide range of family involvement programs, challenges, needs, strategies, and contexts—ways to get out of the box and increase school-family connections. This review of the literature provides greater clarity about creating partnerships among schools, families, and community groups. Most importantly, these studies provide insight into the how and why of programs adopting contextually driven approaches rather than limiting efforts to those activities that are convenient to school staff, time, and facilities. The document contains 1) an overview of new literature, 2) a matrix of the trends across the studies, 3) an explanation of the types of research studies included in the review, and 4) detailed descriptions of each of the included reports.

Readiness: School, Family, and Community Connections (PDF file: 940K) The fourth research synthesis focusing on family and community connections with schools, Readiness: School, Family, and Community Connections describes 48 research studies on the contextual factors associated with children's readiness. In particular, this synthesis explores children's abilities as they make the transition to kindergarten, factors associated with these abilities, and implications of these factors on children's later success. It also discusses the effectiveness of a variety of early childhood or preschool interventions that include a family or community focus. 
Print copies are available from the SEDL Store.

Diversity: School, Family, and Community Connections (PDF file: 840K) is the third in a series of reports to help local school, community, and family leaders obtain useful research-based information about key educational issues. This synthesis focuses specifically on three categories: race or ethnicity, culture (including language), and socioeconomic status. The report also explores barriers to involvement for minority and low-income families, strategies that have been used to address those barriers, and recommendations that local educational leaders can adapt to address their specific needs. It is based on a review of over 64 studies. 
Print copies are available from the SEDL Store.

A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement (PDF file: 1.2 MB) This review of the research examines the growing evidence that family and community connections with schools make a difference in student success. It is a synthesis of 51 studies about the impact of family and community involvement on student achievement, and effective strategies to connect schools, families and community. This publication is the second in the series of annual research syntheses by SEDL's National Center for Family & Community Connections with Schools, and the fourth in the series of Evidence publications authored or co-authored by Anne T. Henderson. Print copies are available from the SEDL Store.

A New Wave of Evidence Key Findings (PDF file: 28k)
This short handout lists the eight key findings from A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections on Student Achievement. It cites specific studies supporting each key finding, and provides a full reference list for those studies.

A New Wave of Evidence Family and Community Engagement Self-Assessment (PDF file: 12k) 
Developed by Dr. Karen Mapp, co-author of A New Wave of Evidence and Lecturer in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, this simple tool can help you assess where your school or school district is in relation to the report's recommendations. It is designed to be used as a supplement to presentations or discussions about A New Wave of Evidence.

Emerging Issues in School, Family, & Community Connections(PDF file: 531K) is the first in a series of research syntheses that will examine key issues in the field of family and community connections with schools. The issues highlighted in this synthesis represent critical areas of work in family and community connections with schools where clarification, agreement, and further development are needed, as well as promising new directions that are emerging. It is based on a review of over 160 publications. You may also view this document in HTML format. Print copies are available from the SEDL Store.

AGNES LITTLE HOME SCHOOL COMPACT

 

As a school community, we will strive to:

·         Believe each child can learn

·         Provide a curriculum and classroom environment that challenges all students to reach their highest potential

·         Provide purposeful homework that supports the curriculum

·         Explain homework guidelines and class expectations for behavior and achievement

·         Provide a system that supports student organization and responsibility for homework assignments and school notices

·         Communicate on a regular basis with families

·         Respect and value the uniqueness of each student and their family

·         Support school wide activities and encourage families to actively participate

 

As a student I will strive to:

·         Believe I can learn and always try my best

·         Attend school daily, ready to learn and on time

·         Leave school daily with all homework and necessary materials

·         Follow our school wide expectations and accept responsibility for my actions and my schoolwork

·         Discuss with my family what I am learning in school and provide them with all school notices

·         Actively participate during class

·         Seek assistance from my teachers, family or peers when help is needed

·         Encourage my family to take part in school wide activities

 

As a parent, I will strive to:

·         Believe my child can learn

·         Send my child to school every day, on time, appropriately dressed and ready to learn

·         Provide the school with a way to be reached by phone and mail and notify the school of any changes

·         Provide a quiet place, time, encouragement and support to complete homework

·         Check each child’s folder or agenda and backpack nightly and help the child to stay organized, bring materials, notices and homework back and forth to school

·         Support my child in following the school wide expectations and follow up at home with positive feedback or discipline when needed

·         Communicate positively with my child about school, teachers, staff and principal

·         Read with my child for 15-20 minutes each night

·         Attend annual parent-teacher conference

·         Attend school wide activities and programs offered to help families support the education of their children

·         Be an active partner in my child’s learning and the Agnes Little School community

 

CHILD’S SIGNATURE ____________________________________DATE__________

PARENT’S SIGNATURE___________________________________DATE_________

TEACHER’S SIGNATURE__________________________________DATE_________

Parent Involvement Plan Review

1.     Convenes an annual meeting to inform all parents of participating children about Title 1 program, the requirements for parental involvement, and the parents’ right to be involved.

a.    Need to add more specifics to plan (pg.40)

                                          i.    Reading Support Teachers

                                        ii.    K Teachers

b.    Covered at Open House and located on school website (could add to 2nd paragraph on pg. 40 specific times that parent involvement is offered.)

2.    Offers a flexible number of meetings to parents at convenient times.

a.    PTO meetings, SIT meetings, Parent Teacher Conferences, Open House, Math Night, IEP meetings, FBA meetings, 504 meetings, Evaluation meetings, K Parent Orientation, 1st Day, Parent scheduled meetings with teacher whether at planning, arrival or dismissal.

b. Need to add (pg. 33) IEP meetings, FBA meetings, 504 meetings, Evaluation meetings, K Parent Orientation, 1st Day, Parent scheduled meetings with teacher whether at planning, arrival or dismissal.

3.    Involved parents in the planning, review, and improvement of the Title 1 program.

a.    Need to add (pg. 40) but check with district on wording and involvement with Title 1

b.    1st Day survey, Lunch forms, IEP meetings (Medicaid Form), 1st grade surveys and K surveys (Surveys given out throughout the year)

4.    Provides parents of participating children with timely information about the program; and explanation of the curricula, assessments, and proficiency levels that students are expected to meet; and if requested, opportunities for regular meetings.

a.    PTO meetings, SIT meetings, Parent Teacher Conferences, Open House, Math Night, IEP meetings, FBA meetings, 504 meetings, Evaluation meetings, K Parent Orientation, 1st Day, Parent scheduled meetings with teacher whether at planning, arrival or dismissal, Mother’s Day Tea, K Curriculum Night, Teacher newsletters (weekly & monthly), school website, district website, teacher websites,  PARCC information sheet, NECAP information sheet, Common Core standards information sheet, Common Core Standards information night, Progress Monitoring sent home, academic graphs sent home, Superkids website, Dreambox, IXL, DOJO, Extra Math school messenger phone alert, Book Fair flyers.

b. Need to add (pg.33 top bullets) PTO Meetings, SIT meetings, Parent Teacher Conferences, Math Health Night, IEP meetings, FBA meetings, 504 meetings, Evaluation meetings, K Parent Orientation (under bullet 6), 1 st Day,  Parent scheduled meetings with teacher whether at planning, arrival or dismissal, Mother’s Day Tea, K Curriculum Night Teacher newsletters (weekly & monthly) (need to edit first bullet), school website, PARCC information sheet, NECAP information sheet, Common Core standards information sheet, Common Core Standards information night, Progress Monitoring sent home, academic graphs sent home, Superkids website, Dreambox, IXL, DOJO, school messenger phone alert, Book Fair flyers

c. Need to add (pg. 33 bottom bullets) Progress Monitoring sent home, academic graphs sent home, email contacts, texting contacts

d. Need to add (pg. 34 top bullets) Common Core standards information sheet, Common Core Standards information night, PARCC information sheet, NECAP information sheet, PTO Meeting flyers, Parent Teacher Conferences letter, Math Health Night flyers, IEP meeting invites, FBA meeting invites, 504 meeting invites, Evaluation meeting invites, K Parent Orientation flyer, 1 st Day postcard,  Parent scheduled meetings with teacher whether at planning, arrival or dismissal notes, Mother’s Day Tea invitation, K Curriculum Night, Teacher newsletters (weekly & monthly), PARCC information sheet, NECAP information sheet, Common Core standards information sheet, New Standards information night, Progress Monitoring sent home, academic graphs sent home

e. Need to add (pg. 34 second bullets) Progress Monitoring Notes sent home during year, IEP progress notes, IEP meetings, FBA meetings and notes, 504 meetings

f. Remove (pg. 34 bullet 4) School Report Night, Office referral forms, Common Core Standards information night

g. Need to add (pg. 34 bullet 5) Texting as needed, Face to face communication before and after school

h. Need to add (pg. 34 bullet 6) Progress Monitoring sent home, academic graphs sent home, homework sent home

i. Need to add (pg. 35 bullet 1) Certificates, behavior charts, Progress Monitoring Letters, AR Star reports, Fact Master certificates, Super Reader prize, Physical Education Award, Blue bucks, purchases from school store, 5th grade awards night, K celebration

j. Need to add (pg. 35 bullet 4) District provided professional development such as Promoting Parental Involvement

k. Need to add (pg. 35 bullet 5) 504 Plans, PTO meetings, FBA meetings, Evaluation Team meetings,

l. Remove??? (pg. 35 bullet 5) Personal Literacy Plans

m. Need to add (pg. 36 bullet 1) Report Card, Common Core Information Sheet, Star Progress Reports, Progress Reports, AR reports, IEP progress notes, Progress Monitoring Notes,

n. Need to add (pg. 36 bullet 2) Student planners, Friday packets

o. Need to add (pg. 36 bullet 3) Common Core Information Night, parent requested meetings before and after school

p. Need to add (pg. 36 bullet 4) Transitioning from elementary to middle school, IEP meetings, FBA meetings, Evaluation Team meetings, 504 meetings

q. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 1) Principal at arrival and dismissal, teachers greeting at morning supervision, teachers interaction at dismissal.

r. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 2) 1st Day Celebration Survey, Parent Survey at the end of events, 1st Day Celebration Packet

s. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 4) PTO meetings, PTO sponsored events, SEAC (check acronym)  Advisory Committee meetings,

t. Remove (pg. 37 bullet 4) Parent Involvement Team Workshops

u. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 5) Interpreters, Parent Liaisons from district,

v. Remove (pg. 37 bullet 6) Provide child care services

w. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 6) Allow flexibility to bring children to meetings and events.

x. Need to add (pg. 37 bullet 7) Thank you notes, small gifts of appreciation

y. Remove (pg. 38 bullet 2) Remove Even Start

z.  (pg. 35 bullet 3) Remove all and add..

Family Health Math Fun Night in November

            Grocery Event in January

            Grade Level Parent Academic Learning Activity in October

            PARCC Preparation Night in February

            Field Trips throughout the year

            Musical Performances in December and June

            Book Fair in December, April, June

            Fundraisers as determined by PTO

Remove Open Houses

5.    Submits to the LEA, any parent comments on the schoolwide plan if the plan was not satisfactory to the parents of participating children.

a.    Need to add but check with district on wording, “schoolwide plan.”

b.    PTO meetings, school website and district website

6.    The school provides full opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children, including providing information and school reports in a format, and to the extent practicable, in a language parents understand.

a.    Translation offered at all meetings, newsletters, report cards, progress notes, in house translator, school website, district website, handicap accessible, NECAP information sheet, PARCC information sheet and Common Core report card information sheet.

b. Need to add (pg.33) more specifics.

 

 

SIG Transformation Element Requirement Checklist

Instructions: Complete the SIG Transformation Element Requirement Checklist to ensure that the school’s SIP meets federal School Improvement Grant (SIG) element requirements under the Transformation model.  

 

X     Strategies for teacher and leader effectiveness

X     Strategies for comprehensive instructional reform

X     Strategies for increased learning time and community oriented schools

X     Strategies for operational flexibility and sustained support